• Tim Kashani

“I Can Cook, too!” Becoming a Quadruple Threat: Why Show People Should Be Watching the Tech Space

Advice for artists on incorporating the Metaverse / Web 3.0 in their practices

You’ve heard of a triple threat, but what about a QUADRUPLE threat? The classic definition of a triple threat in entertainment has been known as a performer who excels at acting, singing, and dancing. It’s an accomplishment, to be sure. But we’re here advocating for adding another layer to your cake: digital performance. No, not Zoom style—further than that, virtual digital performance. We’re talking about acting, singing, dancing in THE METAVERSE! But let’s back it up a second. The metaverse?! Yeah...

“Even skeptics admit the metaverse is coming. Not soon, but soon enough to take the juggernaut seriously.”

That’s how an article titled “You May Not Want a New Friend, But the Metaverse Is Determined to Be Yours” on the site Amplify/NabShow begins. Live performance already takes place in the metaverse; from concerts by fan favorites like Ariana Grande to immersive theatrical experiences like Finding Pandora X (featuring one of our co-founders, Pamela Winslow Kashani!)

For theatre folk, we can liken it to Pascal’s Wager. If you’re unfamiliar with Pascal’s Wager, we’ll uber-simplify it for you: more or less, because we cannot disprove the existence of “God” it may behoove us to act as though such a figure does exist, so that should he/she/it be real, we get into heaven. Of course, there’s more to it than that, but for our purposes, let’s pretend that’s the whole sha-bang.

Therefore, if you, dear theatre person who has come upon this blog, let us propose our wager: even if you’re not ready for the metaverse, since experts say it’s coming, should we not be prepared rather than get left behind like those who did not believe in the dot com boom?

With us so far? If so, make yourself a quadruple threat! You’ve got dancing on lock, singing pegged, and you act like a champ—time to become a technician.

Whether you’re all in on technology and the way it’s sneaking into theatre or not—it’s coming. Technology in general has been on the rise, and we’re speeding toward Broadway 2030 faster than anyone could have imagined. Maybe you’re here reading this because you’re obsessed with the idea of Broadway in the Metaverse and you can’t wait to see what comes next.

Or maybe you’re a skeptic, unsure of what role VR will play in our very traditional storytelling medium.

What if you’re the farthest end of the spectrum and you vehemently do not want Broadway to let go of what has been build and rocket up to Mars?

Regardless of where you stand something’s coming, and though we don’t yet know what role virtual reality, the metaverse, and Web 3.0 will play in the future of Broadway, it’s important for all of us to be in the know. Don’t get left behind just for a lack of knowledge.

We’re by no means suggesting that you replace your current practices with completely tech versions. If you’re a set designer, of course you should still learn and create gorgeous real life sets. If you’ve a costume designer we would never suggest you not study the history of fashion and learn to sew. But! Why not also learn Unity, Unreal, and a variety of virtual platforms available to build worlds, sets, stages, and “costumes” to enhance what you’re working on, and frankly—build your portfolio!

Performers, why not get used to the new technology now and be the first one in line for new auditions? Virtual reality headsets are cheaper than ever, for roughly $300 you can be in a new world in minutes, practicing changing “costumes,” jumping between “scenes,” and emoting. We even have a video about 10 Virtual Reality Skills You Can Add To Your Resume!

In 2022, there are more ways than ever to get your story told, and get your designs seen by a waiting audience, why not start now?

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